Tag Archives: injections and kids

How To Help Kids Overcome The Fear Of Injection

It’s every kid’s nightmare—the injection! I still remember the days when my daughter would cry out, “Mom, I don’t want injection!” She would freak out because she was so scared. As a mom, I felt so bad that I couldn’t do anything. She just had to get her injection, no matter what. But when she turned six, she slowly started to get over it. I remember she would really try to act brave even if her eyes showed fear.

It helps a lot that we have a good pediatrician. She’s very gentle with my daughter. She usually explains to my daughter the need for an injection and she gives her a little toy afterwards. But I guess after all the injections my daughter has gotten over the years, she has realized that injections don’t really hurt. Nowadays, she’s pretty brave. She just looks at the doctor while she gets an injection. At seven years old, she has finally gotten over the fear of injection.

Looking back, I can’t really say that I did anything fantastic to help my daughter overcome the fear of injection. As a matter of fact, I usually felt bad because there were times when I didn’t tell my daughter that she was getting an injection. Every time I’d tell her we had to go see her doctor, I would just say it was for a check up. I never told her anything about an injection. I guess it worked because she’s now very brave every time she goes for an injection.

Here are tips on how to help kids overcome their fear of injection. An article by Dr. Katherine Dahlsgaard, a licensed psychologist, shares some useful tips.

Explain The Importance Of An Injection

Looking back, I would spend a lot of time explaining the importance of the injection. It was quite tiring but I had. It was the least I could because I couldn’t take seeing my daughter cry.

According to Dr. Katherine Dahlsgaard, it’s important to educate our kids about injection. She recommends a video for kids to watch. It’s an animated, instructional video that explains the why shots are needed for the body.

Find Role Models

Finding a role model to show how painless an injection could be challenging most especially when we end up in a clinic where there’s just so much crying and fear.

So I tried to be the role model. There were times when I also needed some shots. So I made sure my daughter saw me getting an injection. I showed her how painless it was.

Tell Kids To Act Brave

I think this is a most basic thing to do, to tell our kids to be brave. I remember my own mom telling me the same thing when I was young. I did the same thing with my daughter.

But Dr. Dahlsgaard sheds a light on this concept. In telling our kids to be brave, it takes for us to let go a little. This means that we should let our child sit alone. In most cases, parents insist that their child sit on their lap to calm them down. I was guilty of this, at some point. But apparently, the child should sit alone while the parents say some words of encouragement.

Have Kids Write Out A Brave Phrase

Dr. Dahlsgaard recommends that kids write out a brave phrase on a small sheet of paper she refers to a coping card. The kids goes on to read this to divert the focus on the injection. This is a new concept for me. In my opinion, this takes a lot of work. Looking back, I couldn’t even talk to my daughter about her pediatrician. She would just freak out. It would have taken a lot of time and effort to get her to write out a brave phrase. But for new parents, this is certainly worth trying.

Plan It Out

The kind of planning I did every time my daughter needed a shot revolved around time. I planned her injections in such a way that she wasn’t going to be busy and she could just stay home. I should have planned better than that. If I had planned better, I would have spent some time writing out a coping card.

These are definitely great tips for parents. It’s hard seeing our precious little ones cry in fear of an injection. But it just has to be done. These tips will lessen the fear, on the part of the child, and the guilt, on the part of the parent.